Poetically Political Letter to TGONU BOSSES: I WANT THIS WAR DEAD!


“Peace will bless us once more with hearing the happy giggling of children and the enchanting ululation of women who are excited in happiness for one reason or another.” – Dr. John Garang at Nyayo Stadium in Nairobi, January 9, 2005.

 

PART A

 

I Want This War Dead!

To Gen. Kiir Mayardit,

To Dr. Riek Machardit,

Now, I want not me dead.

Else, I want this war dead.

Release the POWs for peace.

Return the IDPs and refugees.

Allow all POCs squatters go free.

Let the oppositions no more flee.

And talk to the nation about unity.

Then don’t go to bed with impunity.

No, stop fighting – by us – yourselves.

And first put corruption to the shelves.

End our anger and hunger desperation.

Give the populace solace via reparation.

Rebuild our nation’s widely damaged image.

Then pay your victims apologies and homage.

Tell Naath elders: youth shouldn’t die for leaders.

Other tribes also produce leaders: tell Jieng elders.

To Lam with Pa’gan, please fight solitary nationalism.

To Wani with Lado, fan not the dictators into tribalism.

Dear Dr. Riek Machar, we want this senseless war dead.

Dear Gen. Kiir Mayar, we want not any more citizen dead.

 


 

 'HUGGABILITY TEST' FOR SALAAM FI JUNUB E SUDAN! WILL THIS GOOD OLD DAYS' BROTHERHOOD RETURN TO US AGAIN? What if Kiir comes out to hug Riek on arrival? Will their 'looternants' not fall down and collapse? Which pair do you believe will collapse first among the following? 1- Michael Makuei hugging Lado Gore 2- Paul Malong with Gatwech Dual 3- Ezekiel Lol hugging Peter Bashir 4- Taban Deng hugging Nhial 4- Mabior Garang hugging Lul Ruai 5- Akol Paul with Puot Kang 6- Gordon Buay hugging Jesus Deng 7- Mama Ayendit hugging Mandit Angelina 8- Dookdit (in Bor) hugging Nyabathdit (in PoC1) 9- Dak Kueth hugging Bany-Bith 10- Yoweri Museveni hugging Omar Bashir 11- Barrack Obama hugging Vladimir Put-in 12- Add yours here... 13- Add yours here... NB: Oops sorry, I forgot in the picture: 15- That Longbody-(guard) hugging this Tallbody-(guard). This is for LOL (but not State or Ezekiel)!


‘HUGGABILITY TEST’ FOR SALAAM FI JUNUB E SUDAN!
WILL THIS GOOD OLD DAYS’ BROTHERHOOD RETURN TO US AGAIN?
What if Kiir comes out to hug Riek on arrival? Will their ‘looternants’ not fall down and collapse? Which pair do you believe will collapse first among the following?
1- Michael Makuei hugging Lado Gore
2- Paul Malong with Gatwech Dual
3- Ezekiel Lol hugging Peter Bashir
4- Taban Deng hugging Nhial
4- Mabior Garang hugging Lul Ruai
5- Akol Paul with Puot Kang
6- Gordon Buay hugging Jesus Deng
7- Mama Ayendit hugging Mandit Angelina
8- Dookdit (in Bor) hugging Nyabathdit (in PoC1)
9- Dak Kueth hugging Bany-Bith
10- Yoweri Museveni hugging Omar Bashir
11- Barrack Obama hugging Vladimir Put-in
12- Add yours here…
13- Add yours here…
NB: Oops sorry, I forgot in the picture:
15- That Longbody-(guard) hugging this Tallbody-(guard).
This is for LOL (but not State or Ezekiel)!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PART  B

 

Poetic Interpretation

As many people always express difficulties in interpreting poetry, especially these selections from my series called ‘Politics in Poetics’, this is the brief factorization of the letter poem sent to Salva Kiir and Riek Machar of the Transitional Government of National Unity (TGONU).

 

First, the poem was triggered by the speeches by the duo upon the arrival of Dr. Riek back to Juba as part of the implementation of the Accord for the Resolution of the Conflict In South Sudan (ARCISS). While Riek’s speech was oral (not written), nobody got tangible access to it, especially when SSTV jammed it by the time of the news.

 

From the poem entitled ‘I Want This War Dead’, the first two lines of the first stanza is only an address line to the open letter to the leaders. But something poetically funny should be noted at the end rhymes of the two lines: the suffix ‘-dit’. In Dinka and Nuer, that affix of ‘dit’ means big, old, great, etc. So, like the old monarchical parochialists, when I say ‘Ngongdit’, it sounds like ‘Alexander The Great’. So, when you see the name in Kiir Kuethpiny, the use of the Dinka’s bull colour of ‘white bull’, ‘Mayar dit’, it symbolizes, ‘Kiir Mayar, The Great’. The same think applies in my affixing of ‘Riek Machar’s name to highlight their fight for supremacy. That is why in my series of ‘Politics in Poetics’, I am constantly addressing Riek Machar as ‘Riek Machardit’ or ‘Machardit’. This cannot stand alone but when juxtaposed with ‘Mayardit’, it brings out that point of antagonism, which the poem is persuading them to drop. So we are waging the war of ‘dits’, The Great Ones.

To Gen. Kiir Mayardit,

To Dr. Riek Machardit,

 

NB: This ‘Ditism’ factor is seen in how they can just feel like nothing has happened after killing thousands of their citizens. I was downtrodden yesterday (26/04/2016) when President Kiir profusely apologized to the international community, mentioning them by name, one after another, in his peace partner’s welcoming speech, but just one quick sentence and in reference to their previous quack apologies to the victims of their war of power greed in South Sudan. I guess Riek also did so in his unwritten swearing speech, just as they did it in a blanket apology in Arusha. I just shrugged it off and put it bluntly to my fellow backstage protestors, “Yea, he apologizes for money: the KiiRiek duo wants to finance their government, so they apologize, but for having done nothing, to their masters. But who are you, citizens of South Sudan? Are you anybody’s master?”

 

The second stanza is a call out by the poet, who represents both himself and the ordinary citizen of South Sudan. Instead of killing the citizen, the poet calls for killing the killer (the war):

Now, I want not me dead.

Else, I want this war dead.

 

The third stanza calls for the freeing of the IDPs, especially those in the UN protection of civilians (POCs) sites and those in other open camps. This calls also takes care of the prisoners of war (POWs), besides the terror meted out on the opposition parties, civil society, activists and independent critics.

Release the POWs for peace.

Return the IDPs and refugees.

 

Allow all POCs squatters go free.

Let the oppositions no more flee.

 

The fifth and sixth stanzas address the lack of unity brought about by the propaganda pandered out to the naïve masses by the warring parties. This, in the second line of the same verse, should be done without impunity (the culture of letting the culprits go scot-free because they are big leaders or relatives). The sixth stanza asks the leaders to fight themselves by themselves instead of using us, the ordinary citizens, to fight ourselves in their war of greed. It also calls to first shelve corruption before launch peace through TGONU.

And talk to the nation about unity.

Then don’t go to bed with impunity.

 

No, stop fighting – by us – yourselves.

And first put corruption to the shelves.

 

 

The seventh and eighth verses are spot on on the damage down by the war, both on the people and on the image of the country itself. It is upon the politicians, especially those who caused and fought the war, to restore our nation.

End our anger and hunger desperation.

Give the populace solace via reparation.

 

Rebuild our nation’s widely damaged image.

Then pay your victims apologies and homage.

 

The ninth is critically on the tribal councils, especially those politicians who have styled themselves into councils of tribal elders. These are particularly from the belligerent communities, namely the Nuer/Naath Council of Elders and Jieng/Dinka Council of Elders. Most importantly they use the youths to fight their war and encourage tribal parochialism and chauvinism by presenting their communities as the gifted heirs or liberators with the exclusive penchant for leadership.

 

Tell Naath elders: youth shouldn’t die for leaders.

Other tribes also produce leaders: tell Jieng elders.

 

The last two stanzas (10th and 11th) are now on the perpetrators of the war. This is tackling leaders of 4 tribes who are also the ring leaders of the war from the SPLM party and the benevolent symbols of power and leadership on their tribes of Dinka, Nuer, Bari and Shilluk as a few to mention. The theme scheme highlighted in the verses appear in a somewhat accusatory tone to the ringleaders like this:

 

To Lam with Pa’gan, please fight solitary nationalism.

To Wani with Lado, fan not the dictators into tribalism.

 

Dear Dr. Riek Machar, we want this senseless war dead.

Dear Gen. Kiir Mayar, we want not any more citizen dead.

 

In conclusion, the letter poem, though was written by Jon Pen, should be an embodiment of the South Sudanese ordinary citizens, the downtrodden ones. It also serves as an eye-opener to any citizen in terms of the freedom of expression to their leaders. Oftentimes, the warring leaders of South Sudan have usurped all the bills of rights of their citizens in the national constitution. Worse still, they have mobilized the victims to fight the victims on their behalf. That is why this poet an exile!


PART C

PRESIDENT KIIR’S SPEECH

I term it tge least ‘Kirr8tical’ speech ever. They are now back to what they killed our people for and are already ‘brothering’ each other…(below)

 

“Your Excellency, President Festus Mogae, Chairman the Joint Monitoring and Evaluation Commission, Your Excellency President Omar Alpha Konare, Special Representative of the African Union, Your Excellency First Vice President Riek Machar, Your Excellency James Wani Igga, Vice President of the Republic, Your Excellencies,

It is nearly 28 months since my brother Dr. Riek Machar left Juba in the aftermath of the incident of the 15th of December 2013.

Personally, I am very happy to welcome and warmly receive my brother Dr. Riek Machar Teny to Juba to be with us, and I have no doubt that his return to Juba today marks the end of the war and the return of peace and stability to South Sudan.

The Agreement on the Resolution on the Conflict in the Republic of South Sudan was signed in August 2015. Unfortunately, several deadlines for its implementation have been missed, and as a result our people as well as our international community lost confidence in our comitment to implement the agreement in letter and in spirit. Now that Dr. Riek has come and has taken the oath of office as the first Vice President of the Republic of South Sudan we will immediately proceed to establish the Transitional Government of National Unity.

This shall restore the confidence of our people and that of our international partners in our abilities as the leaders of this country to implement the agreement. Now we must move forward in order to address the challenges occasioned by the conflict. We acknwoledge that there are unresolved issues related to the agreement, but I promise we will resolve those matters amicably.

This is the only choice for us to relieve our people from the undeserved suffering associated with the armed conflict imposed upon them. I believe this is the only way to return South Sudan to the path of peace, stability and prosperity. In the Transitional Government of National Unity we do not expect opposition neither in the Exective nor in the Parliament. All of us who are the stakeholders have the collective responsibility to make sure that we cooperate and work together as one team so that we deliver results. I therefore call upon all of you – and especially the First Vice President and the Vice President – to cooperate with me so that we return our country to the peaceful coexistence.

The reception and inauguration of Riek Machar as the First Vice President is a responsibility of the government of the Republic of South Sudan. Having considered all the political and security implications, the government decided that the public rally should be well prepared for the time ahead when all stakeholders including will particpate in that public rally.

I take this opportunity to apologize to the international community for the delay in implementation of this agreement. I also wish to express my vote of thanks to the internation al community – the UN Security Council, the UN Human Rights and humanitarian agencies, UNMISS, the Troika, AU, IGAD, EU, Russia, China, Japan and our other regional and international partners – for their positive efforts and commitment.

We appreciate their genuine concerns about the situation in South Sudan and the assistance provided to our people. Now, we are determined to see into it that we comply with our obligations as provided for in the agreement and our consitution. This will enable us to meet the expectations of our people and the international community.

In conclusion, Your Excellencies, I repeat our apologies to the people of South Sudan for the situation we the leaders have created. You have been patient throughout the duration of this crisis. Though the road ahead will still continue to have challenges but we are committed and determined to move our country forward. Thank you for the long patience and I ask you to continue to endure with us. I also ask you to join me and my brother Riek Machar in the spirit of forgiveness and reconciliation. I call upon our politicians and all the citizens of South Sudan to put their differences and personal interests aside for the welfare of our independence. Our people are tired of war and they need peace now.

Together we can accomplish far more than when we are divided. Our strength lies only in our unity. From this day I urge all of you to embrace the fact that we are all South Sudanese, united in love of our country and our desire to build a better future for ourselves and many generations to come. May Almighty God bless all of you and bless South Sudan. Thank you very much.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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